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News

2011

  • Launch of Film Archives UK

    In Autumn 2011 the 'Film Archive Forum' is being re-launched as Film Archives UK. Established in 1987, Film Archives UK represents the UK's public sector film and television archives. These archives care for the moving image heritage of the nation, collecting, preserving and providing access to screen history from the birth of film to the present day. Film Archives UK’s new website is currently being developed. Please visit the former Film Archive Forum website and the Moving History site to find out more about the archives and the films in their collections.

     

  • A Sense of Place: Our Screen Heritage

    An Online Exhibition from Wessex Film and Sound Archive

    At Wessex Film and Sound Archive you can see and hear history, from late Victorian times to the present day, through moving images and sound recordings. The Archive contains over 35,000 film and sound recordings relating to central southern England, including film and tapes of local TV and radio, to study and enjoy.

    Wessex Film and Sound Archive is open to the public for viewing and research, for further information visit our website.

    The online exhibition "A Sense of Place: Our Screen Heritage" is a micro exhibition aimed at showcasing a small part of our collection. It highlights some of the work done as part of a project funded by the UKFilm Council. Screen Heritage UK - 'Revitalising the Regions' aimed to focus on film material that reinforces a sense of place within the region.

    Take a look and let us know what you think - http://www.flickr.com/photos/wessexfilm/sets/72157625859718496/

    We are also using Flickr to post updates on Wessex Film and Sound Archive and the work it does in making archive film and sound accessible to as wide an audience as possible.

    You can also follow us on Twitter: .

    Posted: 25 February 2011

2010

  • NRFTA Job Vacancies

    The Northern Region Film and Television Archive (NRFTA) are looking for two Film Archive Assistants and one Film Archive Technician (part time).

    Details of the posts can be found at the following web addresses:
    http://www.tees.ac.uk/sections/jobs/jobdetails.cfm?jobid=3411
    http://www.tees.ac.uk/sections/jobs/jobdetails.cfm?jobid=3412

    The closing date is 30 July.

    20 July 2010

  • Study on the "Challenges of the digital era for film heritage institutions"

    The European Commission has launched a call for tenders in order conduct a study on the "Challenges of the digital era for film heritage institutions". The call for tenders is published in the OJ 2010/S 108-163209 of 05/06/2010.

    The deadline for receipt of tenders is 1 September 2010 at 16.00.

    All tenders documents can be found at http://ec.europa.eu/avpolicy/info_centre/tenders/index_en.htm We would appreciate if you could spread this information.

    We include below a summary of the objectives and methodology of this study: The aim of the study is to provide a detailed description of the challenges that film heritage institutions are facing in relation to all areas of their activities, as well as the opportunities that digital technologies offer. For the 6 themes listed in section 1 above, the following questions should be addressed:

    • Collection of digital material

    • What would be the cost of extending the legal or compulsory deposit to digital support?
    • What kind of digital supports should be covered by legal or compulsory deposit? And what kind of audiovisual works should be included?
    • Is it appropriate to establish standards at European level specifying the conditions for the submission of digital films to archives and the conditions for their preservation? If so, what would be the most appropriate format? (European standard, CEN Workshop agreementÉ)? Which are the parameters that should be described in this standard?
    • Storage and long-term preservation of digital film material

    • What are at present the options for long-term preservation of films in digital supports?
    • Which elements should a national policy on preservation of digital films contain?
    • What can be learnt from benchmarking with other sectors facing the same challenge of long- term preservation of digital archives?
    • In which areas would it be necessary to do further research?
    • How much would need to be invested in equipment and professional training in order to ensure the long-term survival of cinema in digital format?
    • Is a common digital film archive an option in order to pull expertise and reduce scale costs?
    • Application of digital technologies for restoration

    • How could the costs of digital restoration be further reduced?
    • Which specific areas require additional research?
    • What can be learnt from other sectors?
    • Digitisation and integration in Europeana

    • What should be included in national strategies and plans for digitisation of film heritage?
    • Which kind of cultural and economic considerations need to be made in order to decide what to include in the digitisation strategy?
    • What is being done by Film Heritage Institutions that have digitised their collections in order to ensure the long term survival of the digital archives?
    • What is hindering Film Heritage Institutions from making available films and related film material to Europeana, in particular through sector or national "aggregators"?
    • Increased access to collections thanks to new technologies

    • Which are the new ways for providing access to film heritage thanks to new technologies?
    • Which new audiences could be reached thanks to these new channels?
    • Digital cinema and film heritage

    • What would be the cost of equipping cinematheques with digital projectors? And what would be the cultural cost of not doing so?
    • Are specific standards for the projection of digitised heritage film needed? If so, what parameters should they include?

    The methodology of work should be the following:

    The contractor shall evaluate the awareness and readiness for changes of film heritage institutions and national administrations in the 27 Member States, and identify problems and best practices. He shall also analyse and compare the situation with film heritage institutions in the USA. In addition, it will describe the strategies of American majors and a representative sample of European production companies for long-term preservation and access to their digital or digitised films.

    The contractor shall analyse the challenges, opportunities and solutions found in relation to digital archive and on-line access in the archives of the public service broadcasters sector and another sector facing the same challenge of digital archiving and digital access and recommend which of the planned or adopted solutions can be applied also to film heritage. To this end, tenderers shall propose one suitable sector in their offers, taking into account the possibility of extrapolating the experience to the film heritage sector.

    The contractor shall make proposals concerning the legal / organisational / technical / professional qualification changes that should be introduced to ensure that film archives will continue to perform their role in the digital era. An estimate of the cost of those changes should also be provided.

    The conclusions of the study should provide policy options for EU and Member States as well as recommendations and a provisional calendar for film heritage institutions for adapting their activities to the digital era. Each policy option shall be analysed in terms of cost/benefit, including the risks and costs of non-action in cultural and economic terms. The policy options should be quantified in terms of financial investment. All the challenges described in point 2.1.1 should be addressed.

    The results of the study will be an important input for a possible revision of the Film Heritage Recommendation.

    The ultimate objective is a contribution to the implementation of Article 167 of the TFEU (ex Article 151 TEC)

    Posted: 30 June 2010

  • Film Archive Project Cataloguers (HCC1136521)

    Salary
    £23,343 - £26,277 per annum (pro rata for part-time)
    Additional Payments
    N/A
    Work Location
    Hampshire Record Office, Winchester
    Hours per week
    Up to 37 hours per week
    Type of contract
    Temporary Contract
    Duration of Contract (if applicable)
    Until 30 June 2011

    You’ll join a small team responsible for the operation of Wessex Film and Sound Archive (WFSA) at Hampshire Record Office, which provides a regional service to owners and users of local archive cinefilm, video and sound recordings. Your role will be to assist in the selection and cataloguing of a minimum of 600 archive films for a regional cataloguing and digitisation project at WFSA. This will include negotiating with depositors and rights owners, carrying out research, including personal visits to film makers or their relatives, and fully cataloguing each item in context to a national standard defined for the project, to help increase public access to WFSA film collections.

    A degree and postgraduate qualification in the archive, library or museum domain is essential and previous relevant experience in film archive cataloguing to recognised standards is highly desirable. Ability to manage and control work to professional quality standards within the project deadlines is also essential, as are method, accuracy and conscientiousness in all spheres of work.

    Prior experience of working with old and new film and video formats would be a distinct advantage, as would knowledge of the region and its recent history (last 100 years or so).

    Job purpose

    To assist in the selection of a minimum of 600 archive films for a regional cataloguing and digitisation project at Wessex Film and Sound Archive (WFSA) in Hampshire Record Office. This will include negotiating with depositors and rights owners, carrying out research and fully cataloguing each item in context to a national standard defined for the project, to help increase public access to WFSA film collections.

    Essential qualifications

    • A degree and postgraduate qualification in the archive, library or museum domain.

    Desirable Qualifications

    • N/A

    Essential knowledge, skills & experience

    • Ability to manage and control work to professional and quality standards within the project deadlines
    • Communication and negotiation skills
    • Experience in the use of computerised catalogues
    • Ability to carry out research to extract relevant information from various sources, e.g., archives, libraries, and online
    • Good interpersonal and team working skills
    • Knowledge of archive film and video formats, and their production

    Desirable knowledge, skills & experience

    • Some previous relevant experience in film archive cataloguing
    • A strong interest in visual media and its history
    • Knowledge of the region and its recent history (last 100 years or so)
    • Practical experience of using film and video viewing equipment
    • Full current driving licence and/or ability to fulfil travel requirements of the role

    Additional information on the application process

    • This is a fixed-term contract, and there are 2 vacancies. The successful candidate could work 37 hours a week for the duration of the contract, although applications from candidates will be considered for part-time hours too, to work for less hours alongside another part-time/full-time Cataloguer, but the project must be complete by 30 June 2011
    • Working hours are Monday to Friday, 8.30am - 5pm although there is some flexibility within this.

    Contact name for an informal discussion

    Please contact David Lee, WFSA Manager on 01962 846139

    Interview date(s)
    23 Jun 2010
    Closing Date
    21 May 2010

    Posted: 12 May 2010

  • Small-Gauge Storytelling:

    The Amateur Fiction Film

    A One-Day Symposium

    University of Liverpool, Wednesday the 9th of June 2010

    This one-day event, hosted by the University of Liverpool, invites papers exploring issues around the many meeting points between amateur cinema and fictional film practice. For around fifty years, roughly between the 1930s and the 1980s, cine-clubs and individuals working within the framework of the organised amateur cine movement created many remarkable fiction films. The works produced by these usually part-time cinephiles developed in a range of directions, and often exhibited very contradictory attitudes towards neighbouring professional practice, symptomatic of the amateur mode of film production, and very distinct senses of cultural value. Some of this output has now been incorporated into archival film collections, but often enjoys a marginal or at least uncertain status in comparison with non-fiction materials, with more immediately ‘preservative’ value. While recent years have certainly witnessed growth in scholarly work around amateur cinema, this has often focused on amateur non-fiction films, effectively ignoring the wealth of fictional material produced by clubs and individuals over the years. This day event aims to address the potential artistic, historical and scholarly value of amateur fiction films from a range of perspectives. Suggested themes include:

    • Surveys of fictional sub-genres
    • Micro-dramas; cameo films, sketch films
    • Epic productions on a small budget
    • Amateur acting/performance in the fiction film
    • Cartooning and animation
    • Competitions; Institute of Amateur Cinematographers, Ten Best & regional variations
    • Group fictional filmmaking in cine-clubs
    • Discussions of exemplar amateur fiction films at selected archives
    • Archival policy on amateur fiction films
    • Screenwriting and amateur films
    • Landscape and the amateur fiction film
    • Technology and amateur fiction films

    For enquires and further details please contact Dr. Ryan Shand (r.shand[a]liverpool.ac.uk), Dr. Les Roberts (les.roberts[a]liverpool.ac.uk) or Dr. Ian Craven (i.craven[a]tfts.arts.gla.ac.uk).

    Please submit proposals for papers (300 words maximum) by e-mail to cityinfilm[a]liverpool.ac.uk. We also welcome proposals for film screenings of particular relevance to the symposium.

    Deadline for submission of abstracts: Friday 16th of April 2010

    Supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council

    Mapping the City in Film: A Geohistorical Analysis,
    University of Liverpool,
    in partnership with the University of Glasgow

    19 March 2010

  • Job Opportunities at the Media Archive for Central England

    The Media Archive for Central England is the regional public moving image archive service for the East and West Midlands, currently based at the University of Leicester. We are a small organisation working closely together to develop and deliver a first class, professional, engaged and responsive moving image archive service to the regions and people we serve.

    We are now seeking to make appointments to work on Full Circle, a Heritage Lottery funded project.

    Senior curator: Community and Acquisition c. £ 25k p.a. - fixed term to September 2012

    The successful candidate will have the day to day responsibility for managing the project as a whole. This post will have a specific responsibility for developing relationships in the community, advising on the development of local film search projects and supporting organisations through that process. The successful candidate will work with the community to interpret the material found and oversee its return to and initial use in the communities in an appropriate form, liaising with the project cataloguer and project technician.

    Curator: Community and Acquisition c. £20k p.a. - fixed term to September 2012

    The successful candidate will be responsible for developing relationships in the community, advising on the development of local film search projects and supporting organisations through that process. The successful candidate will work with the community to interpret the material found and oversee its return to and initial use in the communities in an appropriate form, liaising with the project cataloguer and project technician.

    Preservation and Access Technician c. £20k p.a. – fixed term to September 2012

    This post will be responsible for the physical wellbeing of collections, the development and maintenance of the transfer equipment and the copying of unique and original materials. It will involve overseeing the installation and commissioning of new transfer equipment and its integration into the existing suite. It will involve the technical examination of film originals and the recording of details on the archive’s database. It will involve the preparation of the material for copying and the creation of the required copies using MACE’s transfer equipment. The post holder will be responsible for the care and maintenance of this set of equipment.

    Full details of the posts including job descriptions and person specifications as well as information about the archive and how to apply can be found on MACE’s web pages – www.macearchive.org.uk Closing date for applications: 6th April. Interviews planned for week beginning 26th April.

    12 March 2010

  • Job Opportunities at the East Anglian Film Archive

    The East Anglian Film Archive (EAFA), part of the Faculty of Arts and Humanities of The University of East Anglia is pleased to announce 7 fixed term positions working on its major access project called 'Building the People's Digital Film Archive for the East of England' DFAE) in 2010 and 2011:

    4 x Film Cataloguers http://www.uea.ac.uk/hr/jobs/sc/sc1747.htm
    2 x Telecine Operators http://www.uea.ac.uk/hr/jobs/tc/tc327.htm
    1 x Workflow Co-ordinator http://www.uea.ac.uk/hr/jobs/sc/sc1746.htm
    Please note that the closing date for applications is 12 noon, 12 March 2010

    1 March 2010

  • Wessex Film and Sound Archive - Technical Assistant (HCC1125983)

    Salary

    £15,138 - £17,034 per annum

    Additional Payments

    N/A

    Work Location

    Hampshire Record Office, Winchester

    Hours per week

    37

    Type of contract

    Permanent

    Main Vacancy Text

    You’ll join a small team responsible for the operation of Wessex Film and Sound Archive at Hampshire Record Office, which provides a regional service to owners and users of local archive cinefilm, video and sound recordings. Your role will include preservation and conservation work, maintaining equipment, digitising unique and fragile items, and the day to day running of the Record Office cinema (lecture theatre) for County Council departments.

    A qualification in Electronics Servicing is required and, ideally, you’ll also have a Portable Appliance Testing certificate (PAT). A friendly and polite manner when dealing with people is also essential, as are method, accuracy and conscientiousness in all spheres of work.

    Training will be provided for handling fragile archive materials, but prior experience of working with old and new film and sound formats would be a distinct advantage.

    Job purpose

    As sole technician for the service, the purpose of this job is to preserve film and sound recordings, to maintain associated analogue and digital equipment, to provide technical advice to Hampshire Record Office (HRO) colleagues, and to administer the cinema (lecture theatre) as a corporate facility.

    Essential qualifications
    City and Guilds Certificate in Electronics or similar qualification
    A sound educational background to O'Level/GCSE grades A - C including Maths and English, or through equivalent experience
    Desirable Qualifications
    Apple Pro certificate
    Certificate of Technical Competence in In-Service Inspection & Testing of Electrical Equipment (PAT Testing)
    Essential knowledge, skills & experience
    Technical/electrical expertise or experience as a technician with audio-visual materials and equipment
    Ability to recognise colours for viewing purposes and poor quality sound for listening improvement
    Manual dexterity
    Good interpersonal skills for relating to staff, cinema users, volunteer workers, contractors and the general public both in person and on the telephone
    Method, accuracy and conscientiousness in all spheres of work
    Ability to work alone with a knowledge of when to ask for help
    Ability to stay calm under pressure
    Competency in the use of computer systems (e.g. the use of word processors, databases, film and sound editing and restoration software, and the internet)
    Competency in the use of potentially hazardous equipment (e.g. hot soldering irons, knives, saws, hammers, screwdrivers, film splicers, razor blades, film rewinders, mechanical replay machines and electrical apparatus)
    Desirable knowledge, skills & experience
    Experience in portable appliance testing
    Experience or knowledge of AppleMac computer systems and software for moving images and sound
    Experience of setting up equipment for lecture theatres, cinemas or similar venues
    Additional information on the application process
    N/A
    Contact name for an informal discussion
    Please contact David Lee, WFSA Manager on 01962 846139
    Interview date(s)
    17 March 2010
    Closing Date
    5 Mar 2010
    How to apply

    1 March 2010

2009

  • FOCAL International Awards 2010 in association with AP Archive

    18 Awards to celebrate the use of footage archive images in the creative media!

    SUBMISSIONS INVITED NOW!

    • Have you researched or licensed archive or library stock footage in any type of production premiered in 2009?
    • Was the use of footage images extraordinary, entertaining, enlightening?
    • Have you handled, restored or preserved remarkable archive or stock footage images in 2009?
    • Is there one person worthy of an award for their footage research in a 2009 production, or, who should be praised for their overall services to the footage archive industry?

    If so, then we invite your Submissions to the FOCAL International Awards NOW!

    FOCAL International Awards submissions forms www.focalint.org/focalawards.htm
    FOCAL International Awards Rules www.focalint.org/awardsrules.htm
    FOCAL International Awards Categories www.focalint.org/awardscategories.htm

    The FOCAL International Awards 2010 in association with AP Archive will be presented on 27th April 2010 at the Lancaster, London Hotel

    Hosting the event will be Lord (David) Puttnam CBE, Chair of FOCAL International Patrons

    SUBMISSIONS CLOSING DATE 1st December 2009

    (9 November 2009)

     

  • Moving Image Archives, Copyright and the Digital Age

    Own-it and London’s Screen Archives, Film London have invited a legal expert and an archivist/curator of moving image work to give you an overview of what steps you can take to publish your archive online, on DVD and make the content more widely accessible. There will be plenty of opportunity to ask questions.

    Date: Tuesday 24 March 2009
    Time: 6:00 to 8:00pm presentations followed by drinks/networking until 8.45pm
    Location: Street Lecture Theatre
    London College of Communication
    Elephant & Castle
    London, SE1 6SB
    www.filmlondon.org.uk/ownit

    Do you have a film archive? Would you like to make it accessible to others, but are not sure where to start? As London’s Screen Archives embarks on a major programme of preservation and digitalisation for moving image collections in the region, this event will give you the vital legal information you need to begin using your film collections on the web, in education work, your own DVDs and beyond. With plenty of space for your questions, this seminar provides a full overview of the legal issues involved in bringing film archive material to light in the digital age.

    Topics covered will include

    • What rights do you need to clear before making it available to others (music, soundtrack, performance, etc.)?
    • How does ‘due diligence’ work in practice when trying to establish the identity of a rights holder? How to deal with ‘Orphan Works’ where the copyright holder couldn’t be found (but is somewhere out there)?
    • rights issues involved in copying to new formats
    • offering content on YouTube or other user-generated content sites
    • protecting and enforcing your intellectual property rights in the digital age
    • licensing your material for use in new contexts, in for-profit and non-profit circumstances

    Speakers:

    Harry Karaolou, Lawrence Graham LLP
    Harry specialises in all aspects of intellectual property law. He has extensive experience of IP disputes, particularly trade mark, design rights and copyright infringement matters. Harry has regularly been involved with disputes relating to domain names using, amongst others, the ICANN, Nominet, HKIAC (for .cn domain names) and NIXI (for .in domain names) dispute resolution procedures, and arranged transfers through the various international registrars.

    In non-contentious matters, Harry has undertaken and advised clients extensively on due diligence and commercial transactions involving intellectual property. Harry also conducts brand protection work for multinational clients within various industries. Harry regularly advises clients on how to acquire and protect their intellectual property rights, particularly through the use of assignments and licences. He has also regularly written articles for numerous legal journals and is a member of the Institute of Trade Mark Attorneys. www.lg-legal.com

    Other speaker to be confirmed.
    Click here for directions to the venue: http://tinyurl.com/5xhct5

    Booking:
    filmlondon.org.uk/ownit

    (23 February 2009)

2008

  • Whitehawk Primary School on the Home Front

    A new website featuring events and activities run at Whitehawk Primary School in Brighton on life in the Second World War on the home front has been launched. Screen Archive South East, at the University of Brighton, in partnership with Whitehawk Primary School, have created the site as part of the MLA Grant Programme for Their Past Your Future (TPYF2) supported by the Big Lottery Fund.

    Screen Archive South East worked with children from Whitehawk Primary School, to explore the relevance and history of the Second World War. Events were run over the course of four days in 2008 where the children engaged in a number of learning activities including viewing archive films and meeting local ‘home front veterans’. The many outputs from these activities can be seen on this site. The site shows the children touring the school's air raid shelter, creating commentaries for archive film, interviewing the ‘veterans’, performing dramas, creating art work, writing articles, letters and poetry.

    http://www.movinghistory.ac.uk/whitehawkhomefront
    (30 July 2008)

  • Chief Executive Officer, National Film & Sound Archive – Australia

  • The following position has just been announced by the National Film and Sound Archive (NFSA) in Australia.

    Chief Executive Officer

    • Lead a national collecting institution
    • Establish and promote a newly independent agency
    • Cultural collection and public access focus
    • 5 year appointment


The NFSA is the primary Australian Government body for the development, preservation, maintenance and promotion of the national collection of audiovisual material.

Currently part of the Australian Film Commission, on 1 July the NFSA will become a separate Statutory Authority governed by a Board that is responsible to the Australian Parliament through the Minister for the Environment, Heritage and the Arts.

The Australian Government is seeking outstanding candidates with experience, leadership and vision for the position of Chief Executive Officer.

Significant priorities for the CEO will be to:

    • work closely with both the NFSA Board and the Government

    • establish the NFSA as an independent national collecting institution

    • raise the profile of the NFSA nationally and internationally

    • take a national leadership role in relation to best professional practice

    • ensure the application of the highest curatorial standards

    • foster a strong research and public access focus

    The ideal candidate will have senior management experience in a collecting institution.

    While direct archival experience is not mandatory for this role, you will have a demonstrated understanding of, and commitment to the development, preservation and promotion of cultural collections, and of the context in which the NFSA sits within the national and international cultural collections sectors.

    Your broad advocacy for the NFSA in Australia and internationally will ensure that current and future generations of Australians are able to appreciate, experience and enjoy the collection.

    You will have a sound understanding of public sector process and governance, together with the ability to manage a large and complex organisation.

    NFSA headquarters are located in Canberra, with offices in Sydney and Melbourne.

    A highly competitive remuneration package will be offered.

    For a confidential discussion and to receive the Information Book containing the Selection Criteria please contact the consultant assisting the Department:

    Tony Grierson
    BSP Executive Search
    +612 8905 3726
    nfsa@bspes.com


    Applications close 26th May 2008.

    Further information on the NFSA can be found at www.arts.gov.au and www.nfsa.afc.gov.au
    (15 May 2008)



  • New Film Archive Forum Executive

  • A new executive has been elected to the Film Archive Forum consisting of:

    CHAIR: Murray Weston
    DEPUTY CHAIR: Sue Howard
    SECRETARY: Marion Hewitt
    TREASURER: Iola Baines
    (15 May 2008)


  • Scottish Screen Archive’s New Resources

  • The Scottish Screen Archive has integrated over 1000 clips, produced by the British Universities Film & Video Council, from its holdings into its online catalogue. These can be viewed at:
    http://ssa.nls.uk/index.cfm.

    The Archive have also produced a new teaching and learning pack for schools. 'The Second World War in Scotland: The Home Front' is a DVD compilation with accompanying booklet. It contains extracts from films on topics including:
    • Civil defence
    • Feeding the nation
    • War savings
    • Evacuation
    • Working for the war effort
    • Victory celebrations.

    The pack costs £15.00. Contact ssaenquiries@nls.uk for more information or to order a copy. (15 May 2008)


  • North West Film Archive Completes Cataloguing Project
    The North West Film Archive has completed its Arts and Humanities Research Council funded cataloguing project of BBC North West regional news and documentaries from 1966-1986. All 687 regional programmes and nearly 1,000 news stories have been transferred to DigiBeta tape and DVD - making over 220 hours of material newly accessible.
    http://www.nwfa.mmu.ac.uk:591/bbc/default.htm
    (15 May 2008)


  • East Anglian Film Archive Releases New DVDs
    The East Anglian Film Archive has released a new set of DVDs, ‘Your Region On Film’ which draw on rare footage from the Archive’s holdings. More information on individual titles, such The Broads – A Norfolk and Suffolk Treasure, can be found at
    http://www.independentstudiosuk.co.uk/archiveshop/shop.html
    (15 May 2008)

  • Lecturer/Senior Lecturer In Film And Television Archiving

Ref: ATR738

The following position has just been announced at the University of East Anglia (UEA)

Academic Grade 3 (Lecturer B): £35,858 to £41,545 per annum
Academic Grade 4 (Senior Lecturer): £42,791 to £49,606 per annum

The School of Film and Television Studies at UEA invites applications for a new post in Film and Television Archiving, available at Lecturer B or Senior Lecturer level depending on ability and achievements. UEA is one of the strongest universities in the UK in film and television studies, with a top Research Assessment rating of 5**, and thriving BA, MA and PhD programmes. The East Anglian Film Archive, one of the UK's leading regional film and television archives is located within the School.

This new position offers the opportunity to play a leading role in the teaching and future development of the MA in Film and Television Archiving. We invite applications from colleagues with a demonstrable commitment to film and television archiving and a strong record of publications or equivalent professional achievements.

The post is available from 1 September 2008 on a full time, indefinite basis.

Closing date: 29 February 2008
Interview date: 1 May 2008

Further particulars and an application form can be obtained from the University's web page at: www.uea.ac.uk/hr/jobs/or by e-mail at: hr@uea.ac.uk (30th January 2008)

2007

  • £25 million for national and regional film archives

 

The Department of Culture, Media and Sport issued the following press release today (18 October):

Future of film archives secured

 

James Purnell announces £25 million for national and regional film archives

As the curtain opens on the Times BFI 51st London Film Festival, Culture Secretary James Purnell today announced that the UK Film Council (UKFC) has been awarded £25 million to safeguard the future of the UK’s national and regional film archives.

Mr Purnell revealed the funding package from the latest DCMS funding settlement ahead of his attendance at tonight’s opening gala performance of David Cronenberg's Eastern Promises in Leicester Square.

This £25 million fund is in addition to £3 million from the UK Film Council for the UK Digital Film Archive Fund. It will enable the UK Film Council to implement its screen heritage strategy to preserve the visual memory of the UK and ensure access for all.

Using the funds the UKFC will:

 

    • preserve and restore the British Film Institute (BFI) national collection and the regional collections, some of which is deteriorating and in danger of being lost
    • ensure a joined up strategic approach to making the collections safe and overcome issues around rights, digitisation and skills investment
    • increase accessibility to the public;
    • and
    • enable archive material to be accessed around the regions.

The BFI National Archive is one of the world's greatest collections of film and television and one of the most accessible.

The majority of the collection is British material but it also features a significant number of works from around the world. And it contains more than 60,000 fiction films, 120,000 non-fiction titles and around 675,000 television programmes, which is well over 500,000 hours of material.

But much of the content of the archive is in danger of being lost and much needs to be restored. An estimated 30 per cent (123,000 cans) of the acetate collection is deteriorating.

Mr Purnell said:

“The archive is a national treasure. It’s a visual history of Britain since the moving image began. From the earliest silent newsreels to CinemaScope to 3-D, the BFI archive is one of the greatest collections of film and TV in the world. It’s vital that we safeguard its future.

“This additional £25 million will secure the future of the national and regional archives. It’s absolutely right that they should be safe and accessible for future generations.”

John Woodward, Chief Executive Officer of the UK Film Council, said:

“This is a fantastic boost for our nation’s screen heritage which brings to life the UK’s cultural, social, political and economic history. We are now in a position to take forward our plan for screen heritage in the UK which has been developed in partnership with the sector. This money, together with £3 million of UK Film Council funding to digitise film archives will mean that the regional and national archives can protect, preserve and showcase their amazing film collections for audiences across the UK to enjoy.”

Amanda Nevill, Director of the BFI said:

“Through our emerging and nascent projects such as TV co-productions, online access activities and the Mediatheque, we have proved just how hungry the public is for archive and heritage film and how much they value it. This level of investment will mean we can once again set a world standard in conservation and preservation and bring into view so much more of our precious heritage captured on film and that the public is clamouring for.”

The national archive

 

Public interest in film heritage was demonstrated in the BBC TV series "The Lost World of Mitchell and Kenyon", which showed everyday life in Edwardian Britain taken from the Mitchell and Kenyon Collection of 800 rolls of early nitrate film, and attracted a television audience in excess of 4.5 million each week.

In schools, DVDs of the Mitchell and Kenyon Collection are a useful teaching tool in aspects of Key Stage 3 history.

The BFI has released a number of DVD compilations of films from the Archive as free teaching aids to support Primary and Secondary teachers. The first of these specifically explores the topic of Citizenship and Britishness.

The regional archives

 

The regional film archives actively search for, acquire, and then provide access to film and video material specifically relevant to their regions. Almost all of the collections are non-fiction (feature films being the remit of the BFI ), and they vary in size from one individual film to a collection of hundreds of titles. The films are often acquired because of their local interest, but in many instances these collections are much more significant – and of national and international importance.

For example: one single reel of nitrate film was deposited with the Yorkshire Film Archive, by a member of the public who had been to an archive screening. The film shows unique moving images of Queen Victoria when she visited Sheffield to open the new Sheffield Town Hall on 21st May, 1897. A film found and made accessible through regional activity, but of national importance.

At the North West Film Archive, the Manchester Ship Canal Company donated 175 reels of professional industrial films, dating from 1908 to the 1970s recording the historical breadth and depth of the company’s domestic and maritime exploits.

On a larger scale still, the East Anglian Film Archive holds over 1,200 award winning films, dating from 1932, made by the Institute of Amateur Cinematographers – a collection of national and international interest. The IAC require frequent access to their collection, as it continues to be actively used, but their primary consideration was to deposit the collection with an Archive with a reputation for specialist small gauge film expertise.

This is a 'stabilsation' fund on top of the UK Film Council's annual fund which goes to the BFI and through the regional screen agencies through to the regional film archives. It follows the recommendation in the Strategy for UK Screen Heritage to address immediate funding deficiencies in the sector, mitigating the risk of loss of key screen heritage material and thus safeguarding the national screen heritage. It is phase one of a two phase programme, the second part of which is intended to ensure that that the strategy's vision for access to UK screen heritage is supported. The announcement is of special significance for the UK's regional film archives, whose immediate funding needs, and the crucial part they play in preserving the nation's screen heritage, have been recognised. (October 2007)

 

  • Government response to Caring for our Collections

    The Government has published its response to the Culture, Media and Sport Committee’s Sixth Report of Session 2006-07, Caring for our Collections, which include consideration of the plight of the public sector moving image archives in the UK. The report is available at http://www.culture.gov.uk/Reference_library/Publications/archive_2007/cm7233_caringcollections.htm.

    The section on film archives reads as follows:

    33. Film archives We commend the lead role being played by the British Film Institute in creating a strategy for the audio-visual archive sector which should address the issues of perceived fragmentation, and provide a basis for a sustainable future for this part of our heritage. In the short term, DCMS must address the funding shortfall of the regional film archives as an urgent priority to ensure that they do not disappear before the strategy can be put in place.

    The Strategy for UK Screen Heritage has been developed by the Film Heritage Group, led by the BFI with members including the UK Film Council, Regional Film Archives and the MLA. The vision informing the Strategy is that the public is entitled to access, learn about and enjoy its rich screen heritage wherever they live and wherever the materials are held.

    In recognition of the immediate need to secure collections held by the bfi National Archive and the regional film archives, a two phase approach has been adopted for the Strategy. The first phase focuses on stabilising the regional film archives and the bfi National Archive, making safe their collections and ensuring widespread access to them.

    The second phase aims to ensure that the vision for access to UK screen heritage is supported. This will involve working with the moving image archive and heritage sectors as a whole to understand and maximise the benefits of a joined up approach to delivery. A consultation on the proposed Strategy has already been undertaken during the summer, and we are pleased to report that the Strategy has been very well received by partners in the archive and heritage sectors. Responses to this consultation are now helping to inform the final draft of the Strategy.

    (October 2007)

  • Openings at Imperial War Museum

    The Film and Video Archive of the Imperial War Museum in London is currently seeking to recruit posts at two grades for a cataloguing project which will run to 31 March 2009:

    1. CURATORIAL ASSISTANT
    Salary will be in the range UK£18,505 to £21,427 (pay award pending). The role is described thus: 'To view and catalogue selected films and videos ("films") at an expert level in preparation for the transfer by the FVA of a proportion of its digital assets onto the web, as agreed under the terms of the Public Sector Research Exploitation Fund (PSRE). The outcome of this retrospective work will be greater accessibility to the Archive's material.'

    2. DOCUMENTATION ASSISTANT
    Salary will be in the range UK£17,125 to £19,829 (pay award pending), and the role is: 'To create brief catalogue entries by summarising the approximate 12000 camera reports written by British Army and RAF cameramen during the Second World War to describe the contents of each roll of film they shot. This is preparatory work for the transfer by the FVA of a proportion of its digital assets onto the web, as agreed under the terms of the Public Sector Research Exploitation Fund (PSRE). The outcome of this retrospective work will be greater accessibility to the Archive's material.'

    Closing date for applications is Friday 28th September 2007

    Additional details of the posts, and information on how to apply, may be found on the IWM website at http://www.iwm.org.uk/upload/pdf/PSRE-CuratorialAsst14092007.pdf and http://www.iwm.org.uk/upload/pdf/PSRE-DocumentationAsst14092007.pdf. (September 2007)

  • London's Screen Archives - The Regional Network joins Film Archive Forum

    London's Screen Archives - The Regional Network has been elected as an Observer member of the Film Archive Forum. London's Screen Archives is a new regional network supporting organisations in London that hold collections of moving image material. It helps researchers and the public find these collections and tries to ensure the preservation of important material made in or about the city. London is the one remaining English regiona without a public sector moving image archive. With the support of Film London, Museums, Libraries, Archives (MLA) London and a small steering group of partners (chaired by Dr Cathy Ross, Head of Later London History of Collections at the Museum of London), efforts are now being made toward addressing these issues and establishing this new network. (September 2007)

  • Digital Film Archive for Yorkshire - posts

    The Yorkshire Film Archive is about to embark on a major new Heritage Lottery funded project to create a Digital Film Archive for Yorkshire (DFAY). The Digital Film Archive will contain over 50 hours of online archive footage, information and education resources, and will be developed by working with key partner organisations and audiences across the region. The Archive is now looking for a team to deliver the project and is seeking to recruit:

    A Project Manager: to oversee the development of the DFAY, work with the partner organisations and deliver the project on time and on budget. Salary: £25,000

    An Information Officer: to catalogue and contextualise the archive film footage for inclusion in the DFAY. Salary: £17,000

    A Film Technician: to undertake film examination, repairs and preparation for transfer to digital formats for inclusion in the DFAY. Salary: £17,000

    Further details and an application pack are available from: The Yorkshire Film Archive, Lord Mayor’s Walk, York YO31 7EX. Telephone number for job applications 01904 876387. Or email yfa@yorksj.ac.uk. Closing date for applications: Friday 24th August. Interviews week beginning Mon 3rd September. (August 2007)

  • Caring for Our Collections

    The Culture, Media and Sport select committee has today (25 June 2007) published its report, Caring for Our Collections. The report highlights the need for better coordination between government departments in relation to archives, and gives particular attention to the UK's audio-visual archives.

    The report finds that archives of moving images are a significant and valuable part of our cultural heritage, but that they have severe problems relating to funding, the nature of the materials with which they are concerned, and problems specific to the structure (or lack of it) of the UK's audio-visual archive sub-sector. The report highlights the low level of funding on which the regional film archives have to subsist, and the very real threat that one or more archives may be lost without swift action. Uncertain core funding has also prevented the Heritage Lottery Fund from having the confidence to fund film archives to any greater extent than it already has. The BFI has streamlined its storage and conservation to safeguard its collections, and invested in care, but the solutions have been partial and temporary, and the BFI needs more to effect permanent solutions.

    The moves towards a national strategy for audio-visual archives is commended in the report. The Committee says that, "In the short term, DCMS must address the funding shortfall of the regional film archives as an urgent priority to ensure that they do not disappear before the strategy can be put in place." The Committee also hopes that the recent Gowers Review recommendations will lead to an amendment to the law of copyright to allow greater archival copying to be brought forward in time to prevent further losses from these collections.

    Evidence to the committee was provided by the British Film Institute, the Film Archive Forum and the Yorkshire Film Archive. The report, along with the oral and written evidence submitted, can be downloaded from: http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm/cmcumeds.htm. (June 2007)

  • Strategy for UK Screen Heritage

    The UK Film Heritage Group announced its Strategy for UK Screen Heritage at a meeting held at the National Film Theatre on 13 June. The Group was set up by the UK Film Council and the British Film Institute in 2004 to develop a national strategy for the UK's screen heritage, with representation from the Museums Libraries and Archives Council (MLA), the National Council on Archives (NCA), Screen England, the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS), and the regional film archives. A document has now been published which represents a two phase approach to the Strategy for UK Screen Heritage.

    The first phase is focussed primarily on the BFI National Archive, Regional Screen Agencies and regional film archives. It will stabilise the core infrastructure, and demonstrate clearly the public value of the UK's screen heritage. Phase two will be a vital engagement and further consultation with all key stakeholders and in particular the national screen heritage collections to ensure that collectively the sector is signed upto the vision and commited to engaging actively in the strategy.

    Key initiatives proposed by the UK Film Heritage Group are: Revitalising the Regions, Securing the National Collection, Developing Digital Access, Education, and Steering the Strategy. These initiatives call for an immediate increased investment in screen heritage from Government, other key funders and the cultural sector.

    Comments are invited between now are Friday 7 September 2007. A feedback form can be downloaded from www.bfi.org.uk/screenheritage. (June 2007)

  • Making Visual Histories conference

    Making Visual Histories: Critical Perspectives on Amateur Film Practice is a one-day conference at Manchester Metropolitan University, on Friday 14 September 2007. The conference will cover non-professional film making and other aspects of twentieth century amateur cinema and home movies. A Call for Papers is has been issued and further details plus booking forms are available www.mcrh.mmu.ac.uk/confer/mvh. The conference is organised by This event is hosted by the Manchester Centre for Regional History; Manchester European Research Institute and the North West Film Archive. (June 2007)

  • London's Screen Archives website

    London's Screen Archives: The Regional Network now has its first web presence. London's Screen Archives is a new regional network supporting organisations in London that hold collections of moving image material. It helps researchers and the public find these collections and tries to ensure the preservation of important material made in or about the city. The web pages are hosted by Film London, rthe capital's film and media agency. See www.filmlondon.org.uk/screenarchives. (June 2007)

  • PhD Studentship, ‘Crown and People in Yorkshire, 1918-39’

    Applications are invited for a PhD studentship on ‘Crown and People in Yorkshire, 1918-39’ under the AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Awards Scheme. The project represents a collaboration between the Department of History at the University of York and the Yorkshire Film Archive. This project examines the representation of the British monarchy and royal family in interwar newsreels by comparing amateur and local footage of royal visits and events, held in the Yorkshire Film Archive, with footage from the national newsreel companies. The project will use a number of methodologies to assess public attitudes towards the monarchy by analysing crowd footage. The studentship will be held at the University of York and will be supervised by Dr Mark Roodhouse. Informal inquiries may be made to Dr Mark Roodhouse, mr19@york.ac.uk. Further information is available from the University of York web site. (April 2007)

  • New address for the Scottish Screen Archive

    The address of the Scottish Screen Archive has now become Scottish Screen Archive, National Library of Scotland, 39 – 41 Montrose Avenue, Hillington Park, Glasgow G52 4LA, and its new web address is www.nls.uk/ssa. (April 2007)

  • Films from the Home Front

    A new website featuring films of life on the home front in Britain during the Second World War has been launched. Screen Archive South East, at the University of Brighton, in partnership with six other English Regional Film Archives, is launching the site as part of a £225,000 film archive project which forms part of the Big Lottery Fund’s £10 million Their Past Your Future (TPYF) programme, and was created with funding distributed by the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council.

    Over the last year all of these archives (London Screen Study Collection, Media Archive for Central England, Northern Region Film and Television Archive, Screen Archive South East, South West Film & Television Archive, Wessex Film & Sound Archive, Yorkshire Film Archive) have researched and digitised significant World War Two films from their collections for integration into this new online historical resource. The site, Films from the Home Front, offers free public access to these selected films, the majority of which are being made available to the public for the very first time.

    This new lifelong learning resource is dedicated to giving people of all ages the opportunity to discover more about the impact of the Second World War and the immediate post-war period on everyday life. It offers a unique perspective on the lives of ordinary people in Britain on the home front as seen through amateur films and home movies and alongside more ‘official’ sources such as newsreels and government films. The site is a part of the Moving History site. http://www.movinghistory.ac.uk/homefront. (February 2007)

  • JISC Digitisation project

    The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) has announced a £12M investment in digitisation projects to benefit UK higher and further education. Among the sixteen successful bids to the fund is Voices: Moving Images in the Public Sphere, led by the BFI National Archive, in partnership with four other FAF members: the East Anglian Film Archive, the Northern Region Film and Television Archive, the Media Archive for Central England, and the South West Film and Television Archive. Other partners include the Parliamentary Recording Unit, the BBC, ITN and Open Media. The project will deliver 600 hours of unique moving image materials and digitised contextual documents to educational communities and the public across the UK. It will pursue a curated and thematic approach; demonstrating how the key social, political and economic issues of our time have been represented, illustrated, expressed and debated through moving image media forms. For further information, visit the JISC Digitisation Programme site. (January 2007)

2006

  • BUFVC becomes Observer member

    The British Universities Film & Video Council has been elected as an Observer member of the Film Archive Forum. The BUFVC is a representative organisation which promotes the production, study and use of film and related media in higher education and research. The BUFVC was instrumental in setting up the Forum in 1987, and from that date it has been supplying a secretariat for the Forum and, until recently, its Chair. The BUFVC also hosts the FAF website. (December 2006)

  • Yorkshire Film Archive adjournment debate

    The issue of sustainable core funding for the Yorkshire Film Archive and the other English regional film archives was raised in Parliament on 4 December in an adjournment debate. Phil Willis, MP for Harrogate and Knaresborough, described the importance of the Archive's work as a social, historical and educational resource, its contribution to the knowledge economy, and the threat to its existence under present core funding arrangements. Shaun Woodward, the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, responded, welcoming film archives as a subject of debate, and pointing to the ongoing development of a national strategy for moving image archive provision currently being led by the British Film Institute, due for publication early in 2007. The Hansard transcription can be read here. (December 2006).

  • Film Archive Forum and BFI at CMS Select Committee

    On 31 October representatives from the Film Archive Forum and the British Film Institute gave evidence to the Culture Media and Sport Select Committee inquiry, Caring for our Collections. An uncorrected transcription of the testimony can be read here, and a video recording of the session can be seen streamed from Parliamentlive.tv. (December 2006)

  • BAFTA Scotland Outstanding Achievement Award for Janet McBain

    Janet McBain, Curator of the Scottish Screen Archive has won an award for Outstanding Achievement in Film for her work as Curator of the Scottish Screen Archive, at the Lloyds TSB BATFA Scotland Awards for 2006. For further information, see here. (November 2006)

  • Leo Enticknap leaving NRTFA

    Leo Enticknap, Director of the Northern Region Film and Television Archive, is leaving the NRFTA in November to take up the post of lecturer at the Institute of Communication Studies, University of Leeds. (October 2006)

  • MACE on the move

    The Media Archive for Central England is moving from the University of Nottingham to the University of Leicester. Its new address (from 9 October) will be 1 Salisbury Road, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RQ, tel. 0116 252 5066, email: macearchive@le.ac.uk. (October 2006)

  • Film Archive Forum Chair stands down

    Luke McKernan is standing down as Chair of the Film Archive Forum, after just under seven years. Luke McKernan is Head of Information at the British Universities Film & Video Council, which has closely supported the Film Archive Forum since its inception in 1987. James Patterson, Director of the Media Archive for Central England and FAF Deputy Chair, will take over until a new Chair is selected. (September 2006)

  • National Council on Archives joins the Film Archive Forum

    The National Council on Archives has joined the Film Archive Forum as an Observer member. The National Council on Archives was established in 1988 to bring together the major bodies and organisations, including service providers, users, depositors and policy makers, across the UK concerned with archives and their use. It aims to develop consensus on matters of mutual concern and provide an authoritative common voice for the archival community. It has been closely associated with the UK film archiving sector in recent years, and the Film Archive Forum is a member of the NCA. (September 2006)

  • BFI National Archive

    As part of a general rebranding exercise at the British Film Institute, the bfi National Film and Television Archive has been renamed the BFI National Archive. The BFI National Archive is one of the world's greatest collections of film and television. The archive contains more than 50,000 fiction films, over 100,000 non-fiction titles and around 625,000 television programmes. (September 2006)

  • Caring for our Collections

    The Culture Media and Sport Select Committe has announced a new inquiry, Caring for our Collections. This inquiry is a sequel to the Committee’s recent inquiry and Third Report, Protecting and Preserving our Heritage, which concentrated on the historic environment, namely built heritage and archaeology. The focus of new inquiry will be on museums and galleries, cultural property and archives. The themes of the inquiry include the adequacy of the budget for museums, galleries and archives, the impact of the London 2012 Olympics on Lottery funding for their sector, acquisition and disposal policies with particular reference to due diligence obligations on acquisition and legal restrictions on disposal of objects, and the remit and effectiveness of DCMS, the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council and other relevant organisations in representing cultural interests inside and outside Government. For further information, see here. The deadline for submissions is 28 September 2006. (July 2006)

  • British Library becomes Observer member of Film Archive Forum

    The British Library has become an Observer member of the Film Archive Forum. The British Library has a significant collecting and service presence in the area of sound and moving image (including housing the British Library Sound Archive), and it is keen to play a wider part in facilitating the development of a sustainable national framework for film heritage in the UK. Other Observer members of the Film Archive Forum with a national overview of archival provision are the Museums Libraries and Archives Council and the National Archives. (June 2006)

  • UNESCO World Day for Audiovisual Heritage feasibility study

    UNESCO has launched a public consultation on the objectives, practicalities, costs and expected results of a “World Day for Audiovisual Heritage” to be celebrated annually on 27 October to build global awareness of the various issues at stake in preserving the audiovisual heritage. The World Day for Audiovisual Heritage can be a means of building global awareness of the various issues at stake in preserving the audiovisual heritage. Public consultation is a crucial part of the feasibility study, and it is open to everyone. UNESCO has therefore established an online platform with background documents, a public forum and a questionnaire. Read more and download a copy of the questionnaire here. (June 2006)

  • Screen Archive South East and Screen Search

    The South East Film & Video Archive has changed its name to Screen Archive South East. The Screen Archive South East was established at the University of Brighton in 1992 and the name change signifies a new beginning for the collection. The archive's function is to locate, collect, preserve, provide access to and promote research and use of screen material related to the South East of England. The name change captures a wider collection interest for the archive - now focusing not only on film and video but also on the magic lantern and on the new digital media of the 21st Century. The Screen Archive South East's new website is available at: www.brighton.ac.uk/screenarchive.

    The launch of a new e-resource, Screen Search, also means that for first time the archive’s unique collection is searchable online. The resource can be found at: www.brighton.ac.uk/screensearch. (May 2006)

  • London Screen Archive Network

    London is alone among the English regions in having no publicy-funded archive collecting with a specifically regional focus. A survey conducted by ALM London in 2004 showed that there was a large number of archives, libraries and museums in london which held relevant audiovisual material, but that fw of these collected proactively, and a high proportion had significant concerns about care, storage and access. Moving image material made in or about London is remaining uncollected, is at risk or inaccessible to users. Following an option appraisal, ALM London is working with key partners (including the Film Archive Forum to address these gaps and established what is being described as a London Screen Archive Network.

    A development post is to be hosted by Birkbeck College during 2006-07, with joint funding from the regional screen agency, Film London. A web presence for the network will be created, signposting users to key London collections. A series of exhibition and outreach prgrammes will be run by Birkbeck's new Centre for Film and Visual Media Research at venues in central and outer London. (April 2006)

  • MLA joins the Creative Archive

    The Musems Libraries and Archives Council (MLA) has joined the Creative Archive Licence Group. joining the BBC, the bfi, Channel 4, the Open University and Teachers TV. Membership of the group will allow museums, libraries and archives to engage in the debate about enabling wider access to moving image materials in their collections. MLA are not themselves releasing content under the terms of the Creative Archive Licence, rather they will be seeking to help smaller audio video archives across England to release their content. For further information, visit www.mla.gov.uk. (March 2006)

  • Maryann Gomes award

    Applications are now being accepted for the 2006 Maryann Gomes Award, providing funding assistance for regional moving image archivists, librarians, and curators to attend the annual Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) Conference in Anchorage, Alaska, October 11-14, 2006. AMIA established this award in 2003 in memory of Maryann Gomes, Director of the North West Film Archive, who was instrumental in the creation of AMIA's Regional Audio-Visual Archives Interest Group and served as its first chairperson. The Award is for up to $1,000. For further information, visit www.amianet.org/awards/gomes/gomes.html. The deadline for applications is 30 April. (March 2006)

  • Their Past Your Future

    The Museums, Libraries and Archives Council (MLA) has secured grants totalling £225,000 to the English Regional Film Archives to increase public access to moving image materials relating to the Second World War. This funding has been provided by the Big Lottery Fund, as part of the 'Their Past, Your Future' strand of the 'Veterans Reunited' project. The projects will digitise images of Home Front footage and footage relating directly to the experiences of local people who lived through and fought in World War 2, and the period of immediate post-war reconstruction, coupled with wide-ranging outreach programmes to bring this material to new and existing audiences in schools, community and voluntary groups, museums, libraries and archives. Archives taking part in the programme include Film Archive Forum members the Media Archive for Central England, the Northern Region Film & Television Archive, the South East Film & Video Archive, the South West Film & Television Archive, the Wessex Film & Sound Archive, the Yorkshire Film Archive, plus Birkbeck Film & Media Research Centre, which is hosting a year-long development project to further a London Screen Archive Network. (January 2006)

  • IWM Digitisation Award

    The Imperial War Museum has been awarded £997,000 from the Public Sector Research Exploitation fund (PSRE) to advance the digitisation of its collections, in particular significant parts of its Film and Video Archive. Over a three-year period, the grant will enable the Museum to facilitate increased access to this tremendous research resource and to maximise the commercial potential of this significant asset. By the end of the project, researchers will have remote access to enhanced cataloguing, research and viewing facilities, as well as the means for online payment and licensing and, increasingly, a system of online delivery. (January 2006)

  • Scottish Screen Archive moving

    The Scottish Screen Archive is relocating in February 2006, which will necessitate temporary closure of services for users. The Archive¹s full production library service, viewing rooms and duplication facility will close for a period of 6 weeks, from 6 February. A skeleton enquiry and access service for commercial users and for general public will remain open throughout this period. However there will be a period of one week 17th to 23rd February when the viewing collections are being relocated. During this period requests for hires may be made, but immediate physical access will not be possible until the following week. The new Archive telephone and fax numbers will be active from January 2006. There will be no change to email addresses. Mail will be accepted from 27 February at: 39 - 41 Montrose Avenue, Hillington Park, Glasgow G52 4LA, tel. 0845 366 4600 fax. 0845 366 4601. (January 2006)

  • 2005

  • Caring for Moving Image Collections

    ALM London and the British Film Institute are organising a general training day on caring for moving image collections on 8 December, designed for collection owners in London. Intended as a general introduction, rather than something for professional film archivists, the day will feature an introduction to the fundamentals of moving image archiving, acquisition procedures, cataloguing, viewing access, rights issues, storing, handling and preserving film and video material, identification, viewing equipment, environmental and packaging requirements, conservation techniques and generating surrogate copies. Further details are available from the ALM web site. (October 2005)

  • London Film Archive Network

    London is the only English political region without a dedicated public sector moving image archive. Film London, the strategic agency for the film and media sector in London, is inviting applications from London-based organisations to assist in developing a London film archive network. The aim of the network is to bring together the many different organisations across London which currently hold moving image material in order to improve access to the collections. The project is based on the recommendations made in the report by Paul Habbeshon Associates, Strengthening film archive provision for London. The deadline for applications is 7 November. Further information, and a downloadable copy of the PHA report, are available from the Film London site. (October 2005)

  • New Director for the East Anglian Film Archive

    The new Director of the East Anglia Film Archive will be Richard Taylor, formerly Chief Executive of the Northern Ireland Film and Television Commission. Richard Taylor oversaw the development of the highly successful Digital Film Archive while at the NIFTC. He takes up his post in August. (July 2005)

  • UNESCO recognition for The Battle of the Somme

    The First World War documentary film The Battle of the Somme, held by the Imperial War Museum Film Archive has been added to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation's Memory of the World register. The programme was established by UNESCO to raise awareness of the documentary heritage, and to encourage its preservation. The Battle of the Somme is the first submission accepted for the Memory of the World programme from the UK. For further information, visit Memory of the World. (July 2005)

  • New head of North West Film Archive

    Marion Hewitt has been appointed Service Manager of the North West Film Archive. Marion was previously Acting Head of the NWFA. (June 2005)

  • New Head of Collections and Information at bfi

    The British Film Institute has announced that its new Head of Collections and Information will be Darren Long, currently Director of Operations at the ITN Archive. Long will lead in defining and delivering the strategic priorities for the bfi's library and archive collections. He takes up his post on 6 June. (May 2005)

  • New Service Manager Sought for North West Film Archive

    Manchester Metropolitan University is advertising for a Service Manager to head the North West Film Archive. For details, visit www.mmu.ac.uk/jobs. The deadline for applications is May 6th. (April 2005)

  • New Director Sought for East Anglian Film Archive

    The University of East Anglia is advertising for a new Director of the East Anglian Film Archive, to replace David Cleveland who retired last year. Further details are available from the UEA web site. (April 2005)

  • The Lost World of Mitchell and Kenyon

    The most extraordinary find of early film material in decades is being given its public premiere as a BBC television series and a touring programme. Mitchell and Kenyon were film producers based in the north of England in the early years of the twentieth century. They filmed local scenes, such as football matches, parades, workers leaving factories and street scenes, in many towns throughout Britain. 800 reels of Mitchell and Kenyon films were dscovered in a shop basement in Blackburn, and the result, fully preserved by the bfi National Film and Television Archive, provies an astonishing view of life a century ago. A touring programme (with DVD to follow) is underway, and on 14 January BBC2 begins a three-part series based on the collection, The Lost World of Mitchell and Kenyon. For further information, visit www.bfi.org.uk/collections/mk/index.html. (January 2005)

  • New Yorkshire Film Archive web site

    The Yorkshire Film Archive has produced its new website, with details of the Archive's functions, scope and collections, including information on donating material and access to its database. The address is www.yorkshirefilmarchive.com. (January 2005)

  • 2004

  • New Film Archive Forum web site

    The Film Archive Forum has had a complete redesign of its web site. The new site includes the new sections Access, Guidance, Publications and Frequently Asked Questions, a map of the public sector moving image archives across the UK, and revised information throughout. The site is designed and hosted by the British Universities Film & Video Council. The address is www.bufvc.ac.uk/faf. (September 2004)

  • David Cleveland retires

    David Cleveland retired as Director of the East Anglian Film Archive at the end of August. David created the East Anglian Film Archive, the first of the UK's regional film archives, in 1976, having previously enjoyed some fame as 'The Prof' on the BBC children's television programme Vision On. Out of that original initiative a network of regional and national public sector moving image archives has grown to cover the whole of the UK, as represented by the Film Archive Forum. David and the EAFA instituted the MA in Film Archiving at the University of East Anglia in 1990, and its graduates have gone on to bring their skills to archives, production companies and media centres across the world. David also oversaw the EAFA's move into the new Archive Centre in Norfolk in 2003. Although retiring as Director of the Archive, David will continue to teach on the MA course. Jane Alvey is Acting Director pending the appointment of a new Director. (September 2004)

  • Mapping survey of London

    ALM London, the strategic body for archives, libraries and museums in London, is conducting a mapping survey of audiovisual materials held in collections across the capital. This is the first step in determining what regional film archive provision might be created for London, the one English region without a public sector moving image archive devoted to it. An options strategy is being developed, which will look at the data generated by the mapping survey. Further information, including an online version of the survey form, is available from the ALM London web site. (August 2004)

  • Archives Task Force recognises audiovisual archives

    The report of the Archives Task Force has been published, under the title Listening to the Past, Speaking to the Future. The aim of the Archives Task Force was to carry out an in-depth review and analysis of the state of the UK's archives. The Report recognises the major role that the UK's audiovisual archives play in contributing to the cultural life of the nation. Specifically, the Report notes the concurrent development of the UK Audiovisual Archives Strategy, and supports the key recommendations of that strategy. Further discussions will now follow, to see how these recommendations may be acted upon, including the development of a UK Audiovisual Archives Forum. For further information, and a downloadable copy of the Archives Task Force report, visit the Museums Libraries and Archive Council web site. (March 2004)

  • UK Audiovisual Archive Strategic Framework document published

    The Museums, Libraries and Archives Council has published Hidden Treasures: The UK Audiovisual Archives Strategic Framework. The document provides a blueprint for the future development of audiovisual archives across the UK. The document was commissioned by MLA and produced by a steering group comprising members of the British Library Sound Archive and the Film Archive Forum.

    Hidden Treasures argues that the lack of a strategic focus for national and regional planning in the audiovisual archives sector has led to insufficient levels of funding and investment for core activities, and a very real concern that a significant amount of the UK's moving image and sound archive heritage could be lost. The document proposes that the national strategic and funding bodies should work with the audiovisual archives to develop a national framework of institutional provision in which national, regional and local responsbilities are respectively understood and well resourced, with the aim of ensuring comprehensive coverage for audiovisual archive activity across the UK.

    To download Hidden Treasures visit the documents page. (March 2004)

  • Re:source becomes MLA

    Re:source, the Council for Museums, Archives and Libraries, has announced that from now on it will be called the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council (MLA), with the web address http://www.mla.gov.uk/. MLA is an Observer member of the Film Archive Forum. (February 2004)

  • Yorkshire Film Archive opening of new premises

    The Yorkshire Film Archive celebrated the opening of its new premises at the Fountains Learning Centre, York St John College, on 21 January. The state-of-the-art facilities have been paid for through the Heritage Lottery Fund. HLF Chair Liz Forgan gave a keynote address at the opening. (January 2004)

    2003

  • Scottish Screen Archive Access Catalogue

    The Scottish Screen Archive has published an online Access Catalogue, which represents those titles in the Archive which have been preserved and copied onto a viewing format. The site includes some moving image clips, stills and links to contextual information. The catalogue is available at http://www.scottishscreen.com/archivelive. (December 2003)

  • Nation on Film

    The BBC is transmitting a series, Nation on Film (Tuesday evenings, BBC2) which includes material from Film Archive Forum members. There is a programme website, at http://www.bbc.co.uk/nationonfilm/, which includes a wide range of streamed video clips from the Northern Region Film and Television Archive, South West Film and Television Archive, North West Film Archive and East Anglian Film Archive. Films from other Forum members archives will be added to the series in 2004. The series follows on from a pilot series, England on Film, which focussed on the North East, and it is complemented by Scotland on Film, which uses material from the Scottish Screen Archive. (September 2003)

  • Cellulose nitrate leaflet

    The Health and Safety Executive has issued a new leaflet, The Dangers of Cellulose Nitrate Film. The leaflet is aimed at private individuals and voluntary groups who have or find old film in domestic or other non-workplace premises. It gives advice on how to identify cellulose nitrate films, why such films are hazardous, how to recognise signs of decomposition, and what to do if you have cellulose nitrate film, with contact points for information and advice. The leaflet is available from the HSE, tel. 0151 951 3214, and can be downloaded from this site from the Publications page. (September 2003)

  • British Film Industry report recognises case of regional film archives

    The House of Commons Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee has published its report 'The British Film Industry' (18 September), following evidence and representations from a number of bodies, including the Film Archive Forum. The report focuses chiefly on the British film industry, but it also considers the cultural role of the British Film Institute, its National Film and Television Archive, and the role of the regional film archives (represented by the Film Archive Forum). The report includes arguments from the Forum about the important position film archives play in the cultural life of the country, the criticisms the Forum has of the UK Film Council's funding of the archives, and the Forum's ongoing plans to develop a UK audiovisual archives strategy in partnership with the British Library Sound Archive and Resource.

    The report's findings state: "The bfi should take the lead within the UK film and TV archive community and champion the whole sector, particularly the regional archives, alongside safeguarding its exemplary reputation amongst international peers. An over-arching national strategy promoting both good curatorship and increasing accessibility should be vigorously pursued.". The report can be downloaded from the Select Committee web site. (September 2003)

  • MACE in full FAF membership

    The Media Archive For Central England has now been accepted into full membership of the Film Archive Forum. MACE was formed in 2000 and serves the East Midlands and West Midlands regions from its current base at the University of Nottingham. (September 2003)

  • The National Archives becomes Observer member

    The National Archives has become an Observer member of the Film Archive Forum. The National Archives was formed in April 2003 out of the Public Record Office and the Historic Manuscripts Commission. The National Archives has one of the largest archival collections in the world and aims to become a national resource for anyone interested in, or with responsibility for, documents relating to British history. (September 2003)

  • Wessex catalogue online

    The catalogue of the Wessex Film and Sound Archive is now available online, as part of the Hampshire Record Office online catalogue. The WSFA collection covers not just Hampire, but all Central Southern England including Berkshire and the Isle of Wight. To access the catalogue, visit the Hampshire Record Office web site, or visit the databases section of this web site. (August 2003)

  • Moving History

    Moving History is an online guide to the UK's public sector moving image archives, designed to encourage the use of such archives for scholarly research. It has been produced for the AHRB Centre for British Film and Television Studies by the South East Film and Video Archive. The site contains 100 film clips, arranged by archive or by theme, in-depth descriptions of the archives, and guidelines for researchers. It is available at http://www.movinghistory.ac.uk/. Moving History was launched on 10 June 2003 and shares the same name as the Film Archive Forum's 1999 document, which included a statement of principles for the public sector moving image archives in this country. (June 2003)

  • IWM catalogue online

    The Imperial War Museum Film and Video Archive has put up a substantial part of its catalogue online at http://www.iwmcollections.org.uk/. There are some 22,900 records, representing 40% of the collection, which mostly covers the First and Second World Wars. (April 2003)

  • New screen agency for London

    The London Film Commission and the London Film and Video Development Agency have come together (from 1 April) to form Film London, the new strategic for the development of film and the screen sector in London. The CEO will be Adrian Wootton. London is the only one of the English regions without a designated public sector moving image archive. (April 2003)

  • NRFTA website

    The Northern Region Film and Television Archive now has a website, which has a guide to the collection, information for depositors, a variety of documents on the archive for download, and still images. The address is http://www.nrfta.org.uk/. (March 2003)

    2002

  • Hidden Treasures report

    A report on the Hidden Treasures conference is available from the British Universities Film & Video Council web site. (December 2002)

  • Wales catalogue online

    The National Screen and Sound Archive of Wales has put up part of its catalogue of 3,000 titles online, at http://screenandsound.llgc.org.uk/cronfa/main.html. The online database will be added to regularly. (December 2002)

  • UK Audiovisual Archive strategy announced

    At the Hidden Treasures conference on 7 October an announcement was made of the development of the UK's first audiovisual archive strategy. The British Library National Sound Archive, the Film Archive Forum, and Re:source are co-operating to develop this strategy, and have announced that ABL Cultural Consulting have been appointed as the consultants for this project.

    The purpose of the Strategy is to:

  • produce a document for audiovisual archival development across the UK
  • provide information on the strengths and weaknesses of audiovisual archival provision across the UK
  • recognise the important strategic benefits to be gained from the audiovisual sector working closely with the wider museums, libraries and archives sector
  • do the above within the broader context of changing national and regional policy making and structures
  • inform public and private funding bodies on the priorities for capital and revenue investment in audiovisual archives sector
  • The completed strategy will be launched in London in June 2003. For further information, contact Frank Gray, Director, South East Film & Video Archive (w.f.gray@bton.ac.uk) or Rachel Martin and Nick Dixon, ABL Cultural Consulting (info@ablconsulting.com). (October 2002)

  • Hidden Treasures

    Hidden Treasures: The impact of moving image and sound archives in the 21st century took place at the British Library Conference Centre on 7 October. The conference attracted a large attendance from public sector and commercial archives, screen agencies, funders, researchers and educationalists. Speakers included Joan Bakewell (BFI), Liz Forgan (HLF), Mark Wood (Resource), James Patterson (Media Archive for Central England) and Crispin Jewitt (British Library National Sound Archive). The conference was chaired by Gillian Reynolds, the radio critic, and a keynote address was given by Professor Sir Christopher Frayling.

    A very successful day saw examples of 'good practice' from archives across the country, especially touching on issues of cultural diversity and social inclusion; while the point was clearly made that the UK regional public sector moving image and sound archives are greatly underfunded. It was the aim of Hidden Treasures to emphasise the importance of moving image and sound archive to the UK's heritage and cultural life, and to argue for a level of funding that matched such importance. The development of a strategy document for the UK's moving image and sound archives was announced in the same day (see news story above). Further news on the outcomes of the conference will follow on this site and through the British Universities Film & Video Council's publication Viewfinder. (October 2002)

  • Documentary award

    The Imperial War Museum Film and Video Archive is to be awarded the 2002 International Documentary Association (IDA) Preservation and Scholarship Award. The IWM's Keeper of the Film and Video Archive, Roger Smither, will accept the award during the 18th Annual IDA Distinguished Documentary Achievement Awards ceremonies on December 13 at the Directors Guild of America Theatre. For further information on this signal honour for a film archive, go to http://www.documentary.org/. (October 2002)

  • Working Together, Making a Difference

    The Film Council has announced its UK-wide strategy at the Edinburgh International Film Festival. The strategy focuses on the commitment of the Film Counil and its three national partners, Scottish Screen, Sgrîn Cymru Wales and the Northern Ireland Film and Television Commission to addressing a range of different issues, including that of preserving the UK's film heritage. The document, Working Together, Making a Difference: The work of the public film agencies in the UK can be read online from the Film Council web site. (August 2002)

  • Hidden Treasures now open for bookings

    The Hidden Treasures conference on moving image and sound archives in the UK is now taking bookings. The price per delegate is £120, with a special offer of £99 for anyone booking before the end of August. For all details of bookings, speakers, programme, organisers, sponsors and the themes of the conference, visit the conference site at www.bufvc.ac.uk/HiddenTreasures. (July 2002)

  • Obituary for Maryann Gomes

    The funeral of Maryann Gomes took place in Manchester on Tuesday 11 June. An obituary written by Janet McBain of the Scottish Screen Archive and Roger Smither of the Imperial War Museum Film & Video Archive can now be read at www.bufvc.ac.uk/faf/gomes.htm. (June 2002)

  • Maryann Gomes

    Maryann Gomes, Director of the North West Film Archive, died on 2 June. Although it was known that she was terminally ill, the suddenness of her death has come as a great shock to all in film archiving. Further information and an obituary notice will follow in due course. (June 2002)

  • Hidden Treasures conference site

    The Hidden Treasures conference now has a website at www.bufvc.ac.uk/HiddenTreasures. The conference has been called to consider the position of moving image and sound archives in the UK, and will be held at the British Library Conference Centre on Monday, 7 October 2002. Speakers confirmed so far include Liz Forgan (Heritage Lottery Fund), Lord Evans (Re:source), Crispin Jewitt (British Library National Sound Archive), James Patterson (Media Archive for Central England), Trevor Phillips (Greater London Authority), and Laraine Porter (Broadway Media Centre). The conference will be chaired by the journalist and broadcaster Gillian Reynolds. Further details on the programme, speakers and booking will follow soon. For information, email HiddenTreasures@bufvc.ac.uk. (June 2002)

  • Old name and new curator for National Film and Television Archive

    The National Film and Television Archive (NFTVA) is to be known formally under that name once more, having been previously absorbed within a larger body called BFI Collections. David Pierce has been named as the new Curator. (May 2002)

  • Yorkshire Film Archive Lottery award

    The Yorkshire Film Archive has succeeded in attracting £645,500 from the Heritage Lottery Fund. The award will go towards securing specially designed premises within the new Learning Centre at York St John College, due to open in September 2003. (April 2002)

  • Hidden Treasures conference in October

    Hidden Treasures: The impact of moving image and sound archives in the 21st century is a conference called to consider the position of moving image and sound archives in the UK. Organised by the British Library National Sound Archive, the Film Archive Forum, the National Council on Archives and the British Universities Film & Video Council, Hidden Treasures considers the central importance of moving images and sound to our heritage and present-day culture, the necessity of adequate funding for the archives that preserve such materials, and asks why there is a lack of any coherent infrastructure for moving image and sound archives in the UK.

    Hidden Treasures aims to be a major shaping event for archives in the UK. It will be of importance to museums, archives and libraries; to arts bodies, cultural consortia, producers, researchers, and all who make use of moving image and sound for learning, teaching, exhibition and documentation; and for all those who wish to have a greater understanding of how these media fit within the national picture on archives. Hidden Treasures will take place at the British Library Conference Centre, 7 October 2002. Further details of speakers, contents and registration will be publicised in due course. For further information, contact Luke McKernan at the BUFVC. (January 2002)

  • New MACE website

    The Media Archive For Central England (MACE) has launched its website, which includes details of the developing profile of the youngest of the UK's public sector moving image archives. The address is www.nottingham.ac.uk/film/mace. (January 2002)

    2001

  • New SEFVA website

    The South East Film and Video Archive has launched its website, which includes a history of the archive, details of its activities, background information on local filmmakers, catalogue information, and a selection of 25 film clips from representative films within the collection. The site can be found at www.bton.ac.uk/sefva/. (November 2001)

  • New Head of Preservation at BFI

    David Pierce is to join BFI Collections as its new Head of Preservation on 28 August. David Pierce formerly worked for the US government and is well-known as a film historian and researcher, and for his work in film restoration and preservation. (July 2001)

  • The Film Council launches RIFE

    The Film Council launched its £6 million fund for Regional Investment for Film in England (RIFE) on 27 June. RIFE 'will provide cash support for a range of film activities including film production, screen commissions, cinema exhibition, film training, archives and education'. The fund is an annual commitment for three years. For further details, visit the Film Council web site. (June 2001)

  • National Screen and Sound Archive of Wales

    At the start of April 2001 the Wales Film and Television Archive and the National Library of Wales' Sound and Moving Image Collection merged to form the National Screen and Sound Archive of Wales. The NSSAW is financed jointly by the National Library of Wales and by Sgrin. (May 2001)

  • New Director for NRFTA

    Leo Enticknap has been appointed as the new Director of the Northern Region Film and Television Archive. He takes up his new post on 29 May. (May 2001)

  • Researcher's Guide Online

    The British Universities Film & Video Council has just released its Researcher's Guide Online (RGO). The RGO is an online version of the BUFVC's established reference source The Researcher's Guide, and now lists nearly 550 film, television, radio and related documentation collections in the UK and Ireland. All of the Film Archive Forum members are listed, as well as a wide range of other moving image and sound collections in universities, museums and private hands, as well as from the commercial sector. The RGO will be regularly updated by the BUFVC, and can be accessed at www.bufvc.ac.uk/rgo. (April 2001)

  • HLF and Yorkshire Film Archive

    The Yorkshire Film Archive has received formal confirmation of a Stage One pass from the Heritage Lottery Fund. The YFA submitted a substantial bid towards the capital build costs as part of a relocation project which will reposition the film archive in new, purpose built premises in the centre of York in 2003. The YFA will be housed in part of the new Learning Centre for the College of Ripon and York St John. The project also includes a significant increase in core staffing which will enable the Archive to expand its future services and activities across the region. (April 2001)

  • Holocaust conference at IWM

    The Imperial War Museum Film and Video Archive is hosting a five-day conference The Holocaust, Genocide and the Moving Image: Film and Television Representations since 1933, 23 - 27th April 2001, which will explore a number of themes such as the 'Film as Witness' and the 'Holocaust in feature films'. Significant titles on the subject held in the Museum's archive will be screened as well as rarely seen foreign titles. For further details, visit the IWM web site. (April 2001)

  • South West Film and Television Archive

    The TSW Film and Television Archive for the South West has been renamed the South West Film and Television Archive. Anne Fleming, formerly Curator of the National Film and Television Archive has joined the British Universities Film & Video Council to head the Content side of its new Managing Agent service for moving images and sound online to UK higher and further education. (March 2001)

  • Changes at the NRFTA and BFI

    Chris Galloway, Director of the Northern Region Film and Television Archive, is leaving to take up his new post of Keeper of Fiction Films in BFI Collections on January 15th. Anne Fleming, Curator of the BFI's National Film and Television Archive, left the NFTVA at the end of December. (January 2001)

    2000

  • Film Council publishes Film in England

    The Film Council has published its strategy document Film in England: A Development Strategy for Film and the Moving Image in the English Regions. This document was produced in consultation with the Film Archive Forum, and announces new money for film archives with the English regions.

    The document makes several mentions of film archving and the Film Archive Forum as a representative body, with the statement that the Film Council's policy responsibilities include archives and collections, meaning "the full spectrum of film, video, and moving image work archival activity, eg acquisition and disposal, preservation and conservation, cataloguing, access, distribution and exhibition, education and training and publication of material".

    The full document can be read on the Film Council's web site . (December 2000)

  • Re:source joins the Film Archive Forum

    Re:source, the Council for Museums, Archives and Libraries, has been accepted as an Observer member of the Film Archive Forum. (December 2000)

  • Scottish Screen Archive

    The Scottish Film and Television Archive has now been re-named the Scottish Screen Archive, with the strapline 'Scotland's moving image collection'. (October 2000)

  • Media Archive for Central England

    The Media Archive for Central England has now been located in Nottingham, within the Institute of Film Studies, School of American and Canadian Studies, at the University of Nottingham. (September 2000)

  • Film Archive Forum joins National Council on Archives

    In June 2000 the Film Archive Forum was elected to full membership of the National Council on Archives. This marks an important step in the greater recognition of film archives within the wider archival community. (June 2000)

  • Scottish Film and Television Archive catalogue online

    The catalogue of the Scottish Film and Television Archive is now available on-line from the Performing Arts Data Service. Other Film Archive Forum members with on-line catalogues available are the East Anglian Film Archive and the North West Film Archive. (June 2000)

  • Website for the Film Archive Forum

    The Film Archive Forum has now published its website, hosted by the British Universities Film & Video Council. The address is www.bufvc.ac.uk/faf. It contains background information on the Forum, contact details and links to the member archives, and a copy of the Moving History document. (April 2000)

  • Moving History

    On 4 April 2000 the Film Archive Forum organised its first public event, at the Strangers' Dining Room, the House of Commons, to announce the publication of Moving History: Towards a Policy for the UK Moving Image Archives.

    The event was hosted by David Lepper MP, and featured an invited audience of MPs, Film Archive Forum members, and representatives from Regional Arts Boards, universities, and institutions such as the British Film Institute and the Film Council. The main speakers were Frank Gray of the South East Film and Video Archive and Sue Howard of the Yorkshire Film Archive, and a compilation film was shown of highlights from the collections of Film Archive Forum members.

    An account of the event is given in the May 2000 edition of the BUFVC journal Viewfinder. Regional launches of the document are also planned. (April 2000)

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